Photographer Hucko draws inspiration from 4 Corners

“Jack’s Place” is a photograph by Bruce Hucko, who will present a slide-illustrated talk, “The Four Corners of Inspiration,” at Crow Canyon Archaeological Center at 7 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 10. The presentation is part of the 2012 Four Corners Lecture Series. Enlargephoto

Photo BY Bruce Hucko

“Jack’s Place” is a photograph by Bruce Hucko, who will present a slide-illustrated talk, “The Four Corners of Inspiration,” at Crow Canyon Archaeological Center at 7 p.m. on Friday, Aug. 10. The presentation is part of the 2012 Four Corners Lecture Series.

On Friday, Aug. 10, Bruce Hucko will present “The Four Corners of Inspiration,” a slide-illustrated talk and discussion on how the land, language, people and art of the Four Corners region have inspired his fine art and trade photography. The presentation, part of the 2012 Four Corners Lecture Series, will begin at 7 p.m. at the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center and is free and open to the public.

Hucko is a freelance photographer, author, art educator and radio producer. Fifteen books feature his work exclusively, and he has contributed to more than a dozen others. He has produced interpretive slide programs for the National Park Service and has taught art to Navajo and Pueblo elementary students.

The landscape of the American West and the relationship people have with it figure largely in his work. From 1978 to 1989, he lived in Utah on the Navajo Reservation, where he was a classroom teacher and an artist-in-education — his exhibit “Have You Ever Seen a Rainbow at Night? — The Art of Navajo Children” resulted from his stay on the reservation.

After a decade among the Navajo, Hucko moved to New Mexico, where he worked with Pueblo communities. “Where There is No Name for Art: The Art of Tewa Pueblo Children” (School of American Research Press, 1997) came about from those relationships. The book received a 1998 Southwest Book Award and the 1997 Carey McWilliams Award, given by Multicultural Review Magazine as “the best book of the year on the U.S. experience of cultural diversity.”

Organized by a consortium of area organizations, the Four Corners Lecture Series features presentations by guest speakers from around the Southwest. This year’s theme is “Crossroads of Arts and Cultures.” All lectures are free. The location of the lectures rotates among the sponsoring organizations.

This year’s sponsors are the Anasazi Heritage Center, the Bureau of Land Management, the Cortez Cultural Center, the Crow Canyon Archaeological Center, the Hisatsinom Chapter of the Colorado Archaeological Society, KSJD Dryland Community Radio, Mesa Verde National Park, the Mesa Verde Museum Association, and the Office of the President and Department of Anthropology, Fort Lewis College.

For more information, call 564-4396 or 800-422-8975, ext. 136.