Weather Services honor local observers

Photo Courtesy/Becky Klenk
Jim Andrus, Observer at Cortez, was presented with a 15 Year Length of Service Award by NWS Grand Junction. Enlargephoto

Photo Courtesy/Becky Klenk Jim Andrus, Observer at Cortez, was presented with a 15 Year Length of Service Award by NWS Grand Junction.

The National Weather Service’s Cooperative Weather Observer Program has given scientists and researchers continuous observational data since the program’s inception more than a century ago. More than 11,700 volunteer observers participate in the program to provide daily reports on temperature, precipitation and other weather factors such as snow depth, river levels and soil temperature.

Long and continuous records provide an accurate picture of weather, and give climatologists and others a basis for predicting future trends. At the end of each month, observers mail their records to the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) for publication in “Climatological Data” or “Hourly Precipitation Data.”

The first extensive network of cooperative stations was set up in the 1890s as a result of an 1890 act of Congress that established the U.S. Weather Bureau.

James F. Andrus was presented the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) service award for 15 years of cooperation with the National Weather Service.

Andrus has recorded temperature, precipitation and snow measurements for the past 15 years near his home in Cortez.

Weather observations generally consist of taking and recording daily temperatures and precipitation, and reporting to an NWS office at the end of each month.

Andrus’ weather records at Cortez are published monthly in the Climatological Data and Hourly Precipitation Data Bulletins for Colorado. Both publications are distributed throughout the state and used across the United States.

Emil Shutt was presented the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) service award for 10 years of cooperation with the National Weather Service.

Shutt has recorded temperature, precipitation and snow measurements for the past 10 years at his home in Dove Creek.

Shutt’s records at Dove Creek are published monthly in the Climatological Data and Hourly Precipitation Data Bulletins for Colorado. Both publications are distributed throughout the state and used across the United States.

Emil took over observing duties from his parents, Robert and Evelyn. In July of 1980, Robert and Evelyn assumed observing duties from Robert’s mother, Mrs. Irma Shutt. The Shutt family has been observing weather in Southwest Colorado since 1930.

Wade Wilson was presented the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) service award for 10 years of cooperation with the National Weather Service.

Wilson has recorded temperature, precipitation and snow measurements for the past 10 years at his home in Lewis.

Wilson’s records at Lewis are published monthly in the Climatological Data and Hourly Precipitation Data Bulletins for Colorado. Both publications are distributed throughout the state and used across the United States.

Wade took over observing duties from his parents. The Wilson family has been observing weather in Southwest Colorado since 1971.

The success of the climatological program is due in great measure to conscientious citizens like Andrus, Shutt and Wilson. Agriculture and industry across the state are also beneficiaries of their reports.

Emil Shutt, Observer at Dove Creek, with his helper and grandson Austin present, received a 10 Year Length of Service Award. Enlargephoto

Photo Courtesy/Becky Klenk

Emil Shutt, Observer at Dove Creek, with his helper and grandson Austin present, received a 10 Year Length of Service Award.

Wade Wilson, Observer at Yellow Jacket, was presented with a 10 Year Length of Service Award. Enlargephoto

Photo Courtesy/Becky Klenk

Wade Wilson, Observer at Yellow Jacket, was presented with a 10 Year Length of Service Award.