One big ugly overcast

Editor:

On Saturday, Dec. 28, I began walking around town under a bright and blue winter sky. A chill was in the air, but the feeling from townsfolk was cheery and festive. Few, if any other than myself noticed the white streaming clouds being painted across the southwest by aircraft passing overhead. By the time I made the city library the contrails had spread out and merged to form on bug ugly overcast. The sun with all of its energy and radiance was blocked out. Once again, man in all of his wisdom, had managed to pollute the great beauty of this earth through his industry and technology.

But more than polluting the scenery with these contrails (also known as chemtrails), humanity has run the risk of upsetting the delicate balance of our global ecology. For whatever reason, scientists have seen fit to create these artificial cloud formations. Private watchdog groups have studied this practice and have warned the public of the dangers involved. People have been threatened by government agencies when they have tried to sample the clouds. Congress has had hearings to consider the soundness of this nefarious attempt to alter the weather.

I am not a scientist, but I have observed that the chemtrails appear coincidently just days before a major storm front is expected to hit our continent. Official websites say that the purpose for laying out the trails is to block harmful rays from the sun and to protect the ozone layer. However, the temperature of our atmosphere is changed incrementally and the result is a violent collision of two or more weather systems to the east of us. Check the records — this occurs like clockwork.

I wonder how many lost houses, jobs, and lives may be directly attributed to the catastrophic storms created by this attempt to “play god.” I wonder how many health issues are created by the fallout of chemicals used to create these atmospheric conditions. And I wonder why when we ask these questions; we are maligned, marginalized and literally kept in the dark.

Alvin C. Collom, Cortez