Sled-dog racers are hoping for a comeback

Mancos musher says it's possible to revive racing

MANCOS - A strong organizing committee and robust sponsorship to guarantee a $10,000 top purse could bring high-caliber sled dog racers back to Southwest Colorado in force, says a veteran musher.

"We have everything else - spectacular scenery, expansive trail systems, challenging high-elevation terrain second to none and cooperative snowmobilers to groom trails," said Rick St. Onge, who lives in Mancos. "It would take three to five years to get into the circuit, but I'd love to see the best teams here again."

St. Onge, a retired orthopedic surgeon and sports-medicine specialist, and his wife, Kate, arrived here for the first Mancos Mush in the winter of 2005-06 with 35 years of sled-dog racing under their belts in New England and Utah.

The Mancos Mush attracted competitors from Alaska, the Yukon and Canada. But declining prize money and organizational disputes doomed plans to turn the event into a multiday stage race that would take teams to Vallecito, Silverton, Ouray, Ridgway and Montrose.

So for the moment, the region hosts only local recreational events such as the 3-year-old Pagosa Paw. That event, scheduled Feb. 22-23 at the Kuhn Ranch near Pagosa Springs, offers skijoring as well as sled racing.

Participants come from Colorado, Arizona and Utah to vie for medals and trophies but no cash prizes, said Jaclyn Bramwell who, with husband, Forest, is coordinating the event this year.

Gregg Dubit, executive director of the Four Corners Office of Resource Efficiency, breeds sled dogs at his Hesperus Dog Ranch as part of a dog-sled tour business.

Dubit and his wife, Gretchen, were committed leaders when sled-dog racing took hold in La Plata County in the early 1990s. In 2005, they helped organize the Mancos Mush.

Gregg Dubit cited several reasons for the decline of sled-dog racing in La Plata County: lack of prize money, a lengthy process to get a permit to hold races in the San Juan National Forest and the still-recovering economy that crimps the budgets of mushers.

Expensive sport

It's not cheap to own sled dogs. In a 2007 survey, the International Sled Dog Racing Association found that 36 percent of participants had at least $25,000 invested in the sport.

Dave Steele, executive director of the association, credited abundant snow this winter for bringing mushers back after several years of sporadic snowfall.

"Poor snow - it's been up and down in recent years - reduced participation," Steele said in a telephone interview. "For the five years prior to this winter, up to 40 percent of races in the U.S., Canada and Alaska were canceled. But all of a sudden we have snow around the Midwest, the Great Lakes and New England, and the number of races are up."

Despite weather setbacks and the economy, sled-dog racing has held its own, Steele said. One segment, dry-land racing in which dogs pull wheeled carts or mountain bikes, is growing, he said.

"The advantages are that you don't need snow and you need only one or two dogs," Steele said. "Urban mushers - as we call them - can live in an apartment but still race dogs."

In hard-nosed competition, Siberian and Alaskan huskies and malamutes paired in 2- to 16-dog teams run sprints as short as 2 miles, mid-distance races and multiday events such as the renowned Iditarod - 1,100 miles between Anchorage and Nome, Alaska.

Start with malamutes

The St. Onges started racing sled dogs in Massachusetts with fewer than a half-dozen malamutes. But as they gained experience, picked up race victories and delved deeper into canine physiology and mentality they began to breed their own bloodline of Alaskan huskies, the descendants of the work dogs of ancient Athabascan villagers.

They now have 32 Alaskan huskies at their Galloping Husky Ranch a half-dozen miles from Mancos. The dogs, which weigh about 55 pounds, are fed kibble and meat morning and evening, with a snack of broth-laced water at noon. They consume 8,000 to 12,000 calories a day.

Sled dogs are fast, mentally tough, have tremendous stamina and are extraordinary processors of oxygen, St. Onge said.

The endurance of the dogs is crucial, St. Onge said. In 2006, at a multiday race in Bend, Ore., the Galloping Husky team finished in second place, 17 seconds behind the winner, he said.

The St. Onges are going to the Rocky Mountain Dog Championships in Soda Springs, Idaho, on Saturday and Sunday and to the American Dog Derby on Feb. 13-15 in Ashton, Idaho. The latter race has taken place annually since 1917 except during World War II.

"We've always finished in the money for the past 15 years," he said.

Rick St. Onge takes a sled dog from its compartment on the back of his truck before a morning workout Friday in the Chicken Creek area north of Mancos. Rick and his wife, Kate, operate Galloping Husky Ranch outside of Mancos. Enlargephoto

SHAUN STANLEY/Durango Herald

Rick St. Onge takes a sled dog from its compartment on the back of his truck before a morning workout Friday in the Chicken Creek area north of Mancos. Rick and his wife, Kate, operate Galloping Husky Ranch outside of Mancos.

The St. Onges plan to race their sled-dog teams this weekend in Idaho. Enlargephoto

SHAUN STANLEY/Durango Herald

The St. Onges plan to race their sled-dog teams this weekend in Idaho.

Ryne Olson, a 2007 Durango High School graduate and Iditarod veteran, is raising sled dogs in Fairbanks, Alaska. Enlargephoto

Courtesy of Ryne Olson

Ryne Olson, a 2007 Durango High School graduate and Iditarod veteran, is raising sled dogs in Fairbanks, Alaska.